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RECOVERY TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

Discussion in 'Recovery & Gear' started by C2T, Aug 30, 2016.

  1. Aug 30, 2016 at 7:54 AM
    #1
    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Bob likes this.
  2. Aug 30, 2016 at 8:03 AM
    #2
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine Moderator

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    Spinning the tires only digs deeper. Pull out the stuck vehicle twards the low side, using gravity to help. Don't pull a stuck vehicle in reverse.
     
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  3. Aug 30, 2016 at 9:12 AM
    #3
    bostonbilly

    bostonbilly Well-Known Member

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    ^ on the money.
     
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  4. Aug 30, 2016 at 12:08 PM
    #4
    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Chris is on the money on the spinning tires. I don't run in sand much but I wheel, VERY often, in deep snow (think 1 to 5 or 6 feet and occasionally, more). In deep, soft sand or snow, spinning the tires will take you from bad to worse in a big hurry. So...good call. However, pulling this rig to the low side (which would be to the rear in this case) will not work as there is a tree there. Had he not spun the tires on the bogged rig, he was almost out on the first pull, though. As for pulling ONLY going forward...well, that sounds nice in theory but is not always practical in the real world. Yes, a vehicle's running gear is stronger and geared better when pulling from the rear but there are a few reasons to do otherwise from time to time. One is when you have no spotter (and the pull is not going to be real tough) because you can see what is going on with the stuck rig better. This, as I indicated, assumes a lighter pull. Heavier pulls should be done from the rear when possible so Chris is not wrong...just not "completely" correct IMHO. It is safer for the recovery driver, when pulling from the rear, should a rope or strap break. Another reason, which happens all the time in deep snow, is the recovery rig gets stuck trying to turn around. Then you have two stuck rigs. That is not really a factor in this video though. However, there is something else which would have helped a great deal in this situation. That is a Kinetic snatch rope (think Master Pull's Super-Yanker or a Bubba Rope for example.) Kinetic ropes are not the right choice for ALL applications but it would have been right for this one. You will note that the recovery vehicle starts to bog as well, due to spinning tires. Properly used, a kinetic rope could reduce or eliminate the need to spin a tire on the recovery rig at all and still give a better "tug" on the stuck vehicle. Heck, the longest part of this recovery should have been explaining to the stuck driver NOT to give it the onion but to let me pull him back up on top of the sand. It should have been a 5 min. recovery.

    It should also be noted that they almost never drop air pressure on their tires in the Middle East and seldom carry portable compressors. Given their terrain, this surprises me but my friends in the Pakistan 4x4 clubs are always amazed and somewhat perplexed that we do that. They seem to be sure horsepower and strong application of the GO-FAST peddle is the answer to most issues.


    Here is my write-up on Kinetic ropes from a little while back:


    SuperYanked
    A LITTLE LESS SHOCK...A LITTLE MORE Ahhhhhhh!

    Kinetic Ropes:

    Over the course of hundreds of 4x4 outings, one tends to get the feel for certain tools and accessories which will make the tough times better and stand out among the clutter. One of these accessories I have come to be a great fan of is the kinetic energy recovery rope.

    This review, however, is speaking from my personal experience as well as that of a good number of friends and fellow wheelers who have all become staunch converts to kinetic recovery ropes.

    I have read many articles pro and con on these verses the standard nylon “snatch strap” and there are some strange reasoning at times for one side or the other. For instance, one reviewer claimed kinetic ropes should be avoided because they take up too much space. Make one wonder what he was driving. I can’t believe the argument that a rope takes up more space than a strap. Oh, it is true but using up a few more inches of space to have a FAR superior tool which does less damage to vehicles and occupants while providing more effective recoveries just seems like an easy tradeoff in my book. However, ropes are not particularly well suited for towing on pavement, in a general sense, as they do not hold up well to that kind of abrasion. But for snatching a snowbound rig out of a hole, they are just what the doctor ordered.

    One of the only downside I can see in converting to Kinetic rope is the considerable cost difference. My 30' x 4", 30,000-pound recovery strap cost me $19.00 (on sale) but is generally around $45.00. My 30' x 1” kinetic rope by Master Pull costs about $175.00 currently and is rated at 33,500 pounds. Many snatch straps have little if any stretch with some of the better ones having only around 5 to 10% stretch. On the other hand, most kinetic recovery ropes have around 30% stretch and create a substantially higher amount of stored energy.

    I have certainly been pulled out of a lot of holes with a standard nylon recovery strap. It, as we all know, works. It is great in those situations where the recovery vehicle has solid ground, good traction, and the stuck rig is not really all that stuck. Then you just take up the slack slowly and use brute strength or hopefully “small” tugs to pull the stuck rig out. However, the truth is, such perfect conditions seldom happen when wheeling in conditions where a “stuck” occurs. It is more often that the recovery rig, also on loose ground or snow, has to back up and gets a running start. This tow rig is effectively smashing against the seemingly solid strap (trust me, it WILL feel that way) when the slack is gone using the momentum of the recovery rig to YANK the stuck rig loose. Both rigs and their occupants are subjected to what is essentially a violent impact and shock. Most of us know we had better have our teeth, hats, glasses and such on/in securely or we are going to lose them when the SHOCK of using a standard strap occurs in such conditions.

    On the other hand, in those times when one rig is quite stuck and there is poor traction for the recovery rig to use , this is the perfect time for a kinetic rope. With a properly rated kinetic rope you can use the much more substantive “rubber band effect” of a kinetic rope to do most of the work for you with a lot less shock to all involved. This does a number of things. The “impact” of a standard nylon snatch strap does not really exist with a kinetic rope when used properly. Not only do you not get practically yanked out of your seat but your vehicle does not receive that metal bending and teeth loosening YANK either.
    If the recovery vehicle is on un-solid ground such as snow, the recovery vehicle can build up a bit more speed to stretch the rope and then just let off the gas or even hit the brakes after you have stretched the rope and thereby built up substantial kinetic energy. The kinetic energy of up to 30% stretch will often pull a stuck vehicle right out and the recovery vehicle does not need to spin their wheels to do the job. Not spinning your wheels in snow, just may be the difference between performing a recovery and ending up needing to be recovered yourself.

    Overall, I have found the use of a kinetic rope to be far superior at getting rigs un-stuck in many circumstances. Doing it with less damage to both vehicles and their drivers is an equally important benefit. Among our group of snow wheelers here in Helena Montana, it is common for new people to become instant converts to the benefits of Kinetic ropes once pulled out a time or two. If you get the chance to try a kinetic rope this winter, do so. Odds are, you too will become an instant convert to the benefits of kinetic energy recovery ropes.

    (RDH)
     
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  5. Aug 30, 2016 at 5:26 PM
    #5
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine Moderator

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    Only reason I suggested a pull downhill, is it looks like that was the direction he was coming from. Looking at the video, pulling him 2 feet to the rear, would have freed him, and he would have been on his way. HOWEVER, correctly assessing obstructions, and hazards is key.
     
  6. Aug 30, 2016 at 6:17 PM
    #6
    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Downhill is generally easier, I can't disagree with that. Let's face it...if he had not stomped the gas he would have been out on the first tug either way. lol
     
  7. Aug 30, 2016 at 6:21 PM
    #7
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine Moderator

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    Oh, absolutely. As soon as I saw the sand fling, I cringed.
     
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  8. Aug 30, 2016 at 6:54 PM
    #8
    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I do a lot of communicating with those I lead out into the mountains. When stuck there are two things I pretty much HAVE to explain before we start a recovery. One is (especially in deep snow) that spinning the wheels is just going to make things worse. I must admit I have had a couple drivers I just could not convince through stuck, after stuck, after stuck, to let off the gas peddle. Second is a warning. When using the kinetic ropes (mostly in snow) I will take off at a pretty good speed initially. If I don't warn someone who is used to the impact, of a standard recovery strap, they may panic when I take off. It is hard not to stomp the gas when you think the recovery rig is about to rip the whole front off your Jeep. And that is never good. Funny as all hell from time to time, but never good. hahaha

    A funny story about a time I was stuck and Tony (SupraT from Tacomaworld) tries to yank me out with a kinetic rope. Now I was REALLY stuck in about 5 feet of snowdrift. Tony had his Taco. The first time he hit the end of the rope kind of gingerly and did not budge me. The second time he wound the Taco up and hit the end doing a good clip. Again...I was REALLY stuck and at least 1000 pounds heavier. So Tony hits the end of the 30ft rope, which stretched another 10 ft or so, and it pretty much picked the Taco up and, while I still did not budge, his rig kind of picked up and came back a good 6 feet or more on that big bungee cord. You should have seen his face.
     
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  9. Aug 30, 2016 at 6:59 PM
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    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine Moderator

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  10. Jan 12, 2017 at 1:15 PM
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    SargeBSA

    SargeBSA New Member

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    Hello from TW, thought I would drop this here for wet sand recoveries reference. Note the Tacoma was buried up to the rocker panels before the owner and I spent 30mins digging him out. Thanks to one of your members for pulling him out.


    First Try!
    IMG_20170112_121431.jpg
     
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  11. Jan 12, 2017 at 2:00 PM
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    Rc Jeep

    Rc Jeep Well-Known Member

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    More!
    This is a cool idea.
     
  12. Jan 12, 2017 at 2:42 PM
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    Threerun

    Threerun Member

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    Might look into a kinetic rope. Makes sense.

    Earlier this week my son went off the interstate when he hit ice on an overpass.

    2A15C18C-CF8B-47A4-AC38-3EAA243392A8_zps_46d884517a4c88417278d339de64f671f77e20d9.jpg

    70A88144-1EAF-4FD2-B40E-511246E8E032_zps_0e8e1bf2082aa719a43dca8b97dc99526ba17117.jpg

    It was right at 5:00pm evening rush. Thankfully the state police let me attempt ONE recovery pull before they called in a tow. All I had was a chain and my Silverado. Not optimum, but easy pull.

    I was really thankful for that Trooper. He quickly shut down a lane in rush hour and we hooked up in record time and freed that Jeep. Would've cost me several hundred bucks or more.
     
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  13. Jan 13, 2017 at 2:58 PM
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    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    There is a time and a place for using a snatch strap and for using a kinetic rope. We, in the off-road community, tend to frown on the use of chains due to some severe safety issues. They may work, but there are better and safer options. I can expand upon these if someone would like. Either way, glad you got him out and for sharing your story.

    I tried to help a vehicle that slid off while avoiding another driver this morning. We had to make the decision NOT to help in this case as there was no way to control the traffic in a safe manner so the poor chap had to wait for a tow truck with proper lights and flagmen. Better safe than sorry.

    In this photo, from last Sunday, I was sitting on top of about 4 foot of powder snow so was having a tough time even getting around let alone pulling someone out. Spinning my wheels as just not going to do anything but dig me in. so our kinetic rope was our only choice. It took a couple of tugs to get him on solid enough ground.

    d stuck.jpg
     
  14. Jan 13, 2017 at 3:53 PM
    #14
    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to welcome you to the forum. WELCOME!!
     
  15. Jan 13, 2017 at 3:53 PM
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    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to you too "Threerun".
     
  16. Jan 14, 2017 at 12:27 PM
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    Threerun

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    Aye- thank-you. Looks like we be neighbors! I live in North Valley Helena.
    I have a recovery strap in my garage, and the only thing we had at the moment was the chain.. What's that old saying? When your only tool is a hammer, you treat everything like a nail?
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2017
  17. Jan 14, 2017 at 1:22 PM
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    C2T

    C2T [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Whatever gets the job done. :)
     
  18. Jun 5, 2017 at 7:57 PM
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    JKBob 25

    JKBob 25 Well-Known Member

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    This thread started before I became a member here.

    Once again thanks to this forum. I am that much smarter. I have a nylon tow strap in my rig now. But will be looking to add a kinetic rope also. Thanks guys.

    AWESOME READ.
     
  19. Jun 5, 2017 at 9:22 PM
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    aggrex

    aggrex Jeepin

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    Great recovery information found here! JKBob to complement the new highlift perhaps some D-rings, recovery strap (no hooks), shovel and the kinetic rope. Its just money...Buddy just came back from the North Carolina coastal beaches to check out the wild horses and was so thankful I lent him an "off-road package": bottle jack, wood plank, tow strap, deflator tool kit, air gauge, air pump and a tarp.
     
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  20. Jun 6, 2017 at 7:05 PM
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    JKBob 25

    JKBob 25 Well-Known Member

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    It's just money? Then give me some of yours. Lol.

    I have a tow strap I took from my Cherokee (more on that). And after reading this, a see a kinetic rope in my future. The D rings, shovel etc. Great ideas aggrex. Now I see those in my future also.

    Ok the tow rope. Almost 14 years with my Cherokee and it was last year I went and bought one.
    After a heavy snow fall I went to a park that I walk in from time to time. It's 5 ball fields, a walking paved trail, and some off main trail walking paths. And it's 4 parking lots. 2 on the north side. 2 on the south. And the local cops don't care if you play in the snow if there's no cars there. As long as you stay off the ball fields and the walking trails.

    So anyway. Took a ride over to go play in the snow, and in the 2nd lot I hit there was a mini van stuck. Now I'm about 4 months post op major surgery. So I couldn't even think about pushing him. And I didnt even have a shoe lace to try and pull him out. Even though my Cherokee was a beast in the snow. I had to leave him there. And I did feel pretty bad about it. So a few days later I bought a 20'tow strap. And I have it in my Wrangler now. And a kinetic rope and accessories in my future.
     
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