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Torque in Driveshaft

Discussion in 'General Jeep Discussion' started by mabate13, Oct 21, 2016.

  1. Oct 21, 2016 at 3:43 PM
    #1
    mabate13

    mabate13 [OP] New Member

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    I'm trying to design a torque sensor to attach to my drive shaft and give me real time torque measurements while I drive my Jeep. I should be able to use these measurements determine my engines efficiency without using an engine map. Does anyone know the approximate torque that a Jeep engine applies to your driveshaft? Having a range of expected torques will allow me to determine what components to use for my sensor.
     
  2. Oct 21, 2016 at 6:38 PM
    #2
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine Moderator

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    Welcome. I'm not sure that's a plausible thing to accomplish
     
  3. Oct 22, 2016 at 9:37 AM
    #3
    C2T

    C2T Well-Known Member

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    2.5" AEV Dual Sport lift, 35" Treadwright Guard Dogs, Black Rock Wheels, AEV Front & Rear Bumpers with Tire Carrier, Fuel Caddy 10 gal. Aux. fuel tank, Warn 9.5ti, 125' synthetic winch line, front axle skid, 20" LED light bar , Bilstein Shocks, steel steering skidplate,
    Well, the 1941 Willys Go Devil engine put out a rated 105ft-lbs of torque. The 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT is rated at 470ft-lbs at the engine. Does that help? :crapstorm:

    Personally, I would look up the specs for a specific model, engine, and tranny as that will surely work out best.

    Doing the math required to figure torque at the rear driveshaft (after the transmission) is going to depend on what gear is used and for that, know what tranny is involved will greatly reduce the WAGs.

    Motor Torque x gear ratio of tranny = torque @ rear drive shaft. Of course, this can be applied to final gearing (taking the axle into account) as well.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2016
  4. Oct 22, 2016 at 10:04 AM
    #4
    C2T

    C2T Well-Known Member

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    2.5" AEV Dual Sport lift, 35" Treadwright Guard Dogs, Black Rock Wheels, AEV Front & Rear Bumpers with Tire Carrier, Fuel Caddy 10 gal. Aux. fuel tank, Warn 9.5ti, 125' synthetic winch line, front axle skid, 20" LED light bar , Bilstein Shocks, steel steering skidplate,
    Welcome to the site.
     
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