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What is the Difference between a reman'd and a rebuilt auto part.

Discussion in 'General Jeep Discussion' started by OFFGRID, May 12, 2017.

  1. May 12, 2017 at 7:37 AM
    #1
    OFFGRID

    OFFGRID [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Howell fuel injection, header, HEI distributor, TH350, NP208, SOA lift with YJ springs in the front & GW springs in the Rear. AMC20 with G2 1 piece chromos trussed, Dana 30 with G2 chromos and 760x ujoints and MM Stainless Hubs, Geared 4.56. Tom Woods shafts, Metal cloaks, Caged, 37" Toyo MTs.
    This is an active discussion. Please feel free to add your $.02.

    So I saw 2oldjeeps question on a reman engine and it got me thinking. What is the difference between a remanufactured engine and a rebuilt engine, or other part for that matter. I did a little digging and ran across an old Super Chevy article. I will post a couple of excerpts here:

    Remanufactured Components

    To remanufacture means to make the part as close to new as possible. A remanufactured part is one that has been completely manufactured to the standard of a new part. If the part has wearable components, those are automatically replaced. All core material is closely inspected and checked against original equipment specifications for correct dimensional tolerances. Most replacement parts are new or inspected used parts. If new, the parts should be made in the same production processes as original equipment and testing should be performed to manufacturer specifications and original production standards. If used, the part should be cleaned and inspected for any wear, stress cracks, or and other defects before it is used.

    On a remanufactured engine the mechanical tolerances should be restored either by re-machining or by installing the necessary inserts to restore the unit to its original mechanical tolerances. Either way, the engine should meet the standard for OEM tolerances, durability, and quality.

    New pistons, connecting rods, rings, bearings, camshafts, lifters, and oil pump should be installed. All related bearing surfaces are restored and the upper half of the engine—such as the cylinder heads—should be rebuilt. Usually the only component from the old engine that is used is the block. This part should only be reused if it is in rebuildable condition.

    These same rules should apply to other remanufactured auto parts, whatever they may be. You will find that remanufactured auto parts usually carry a longer warranty than rebuilt parts.

    Rebuilt Components

    To rebuild is to recondition a part by cleaning, inspecting, and replacing only worn or broken parts. Serviceable parts are reused if they fit within the manufacturer’s acceptable wear limits. The quality of rebuilt components varies from one rebuilder to another and many only come with a limited warranty.

    Before rebuilding, all of the components within the unit are equally worn. After rebuilding, some of the components could be new, some could be from a different used unit, and some of the components could be original. The thing to remember is that the “used” components may still function properly and do not need replacing, but they are still worn to some degree.

    There are other factors that can cause wear so as not to be visible to the human eye, such as heat stress and cracks. Consequently, this could cause other problems with the part, resulting in premature failure. There have been many instances where I personally have installed up to three rebuilt engines before getting one that actually worked correctly. This is even more common on rebuilt electrical parts.

    This brings us to another term that is sometimes misunderstood: “core.” This is when you exchange your broken part for one that has already been rebuilt. A core for a rebuilt part such as an engine may also be referred to as the casting.

    For example, if an engine is rebuilt, maybe just the bearings and piston rings needed to be replaced. So the original crankshaft, pistons, and connecting rods were still in good shape and would be reused instead of using new or ones. The final result will usually save the customer money up front. Just remember this rebuilt part is just that and may fail sooner than a new part would. So if you don’t mind possibly changing the part out several times if there is a problem and want to save a few dollars, this could be the part for you.

    The whole article can be found here: http://www.superchevy.com/how-to/ad...etween-remanufactured-and-rebuilt-components/

    Now after really thinking about this I started to wonder. How many "reman'd" engines are really reman'd. I bet the majority still have the original crank that has been resurfaced if necessary and reinstalled, technically making the engine a rebuilt engine if you follow the article's standards. And also is it necessary to replace the crank? IMO, only if it is damaged or has been recondition multiple times making it thinner than tolerance allows. There are other parts of an engine I have no problem reusing: push rods, and rocker arms, and if I'm keeping an engine stock to mild I'll reuse piston rods. I do know guys who will take an oil burning motor, break it down, hone it, replace bearings rings, cam and lifters, replace the seals in the head, put it all back together and get another 200000 miles out of an engine.

    Now when it comes to other parts like differentials, trannys and Tcases; it is virtually impossible to reman either and stay cost effective. So they are all rebuilt replacing only bearings, seals and damaged parts. After getting into a few cases, differentials and trannys seeing how all the parts work together I'm okay with that.

    So in the end I think your decision to go reman or rebuilt all depends on the car part, the performance level and the builders knowledge and experience with the part being worked on, or the purchasers trust in the builder doing the work. I think more important is just knowing what you're getting (The work being done) for the dollar your spending.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2017
    chris4x4, JKBob 25 and aggrex like this.
  2. May 12, 2017 at 8:34 AM
    #2
    2oldjeeps

    2oldjeeps Well-Known Member

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    98 lifted, 00 stock 99wj just beautiful
    good stuff,thanks.
    yrs age autozone sold me a reman starter,said it was all new parts but the housing. it went into a 80 stang with a 460 mod.they offered another when it got sticky. i said no thanks, had to pull engine tranny,headers to change it. paid the price at ford.
    this yr i put a reman in my 00 jeep. it got intermittent.the store gave me a new one and is fine,thats "new" new.
    many yrs ago i put a 302 long block in a ford van,rebuilt. in 20000 miles is smoked just a little but ran good. i sold it.

    so i wonder about the companies that do the work?.
    the one i posted sounds good,,,but?
     
  3. May 12, 2017 at 8:54 AM
    #3
    OFFGRID

    OFFGRID [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Peter
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    Vehicle:
    1979 Jeep CJ7, 258, TH350, NP208
    Howell fuel injection, header, HEI distributor, TH350, NP208, SOA lift with YJ springs in the front & GW springs in the Rear. AMC20 with G2 1 piece chromos trussed, Dana 30 with G2 chromos and 760x ujoints and MM Stainless Hubs, Geared 4.56. Tom Woods shafts, Metal cloaks, Caged, 37" Toyo MTs.
    I was told by my grandfather years ago to stay away from reman's product from Autozone. They are the cheapest in price yes, but Oreilly's will match prices of same product with same warranty. I.e. Lifetime warranty on a reman starter at autozone for $120 (made up prices for ease of explanation) Oreilly's reman starter with same warranty is $165. Oreilly's will match that $120, and IMO you get a much better product. Oreillys and Pepboys I believe distribute superior brands of products over Autozone.
     
  4. May 12, 2017 at 7:18 PM
    #4
    JKBob 25

    JKBob 25 Well-Known Member

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    Awesome post Peter. Being a motor head for years now. Lol. Always believed a reman'ed was better by far than a rebuilt anything.

    Case and point. My 2 cents. When I owned my 00 XJ. Changed the anti- freeze and didn't put the cap back on right. Bottom line. I cooked the motor and cracked the block. Anyway, shop I took it to offered me 2 options. A rebuilt by some company I never heard of. Or a reman'ed by Jasper. Knowing the difference, and knowing Jasper as one of the leaders in reman'ed motors. I spent the extra 1500 bucks for the Jasper. When I traded it in. It didn't smoke or leak any where with 160k on it. Had 199k plus on the Jeep it's self.

    Will make the same choice again today. Reman'ed over rebuilt in a heart beat.
     
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